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20130127
20130127
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the river and an island for the city. >> 1 trillion euros -- that's roughly how much the eu countries lose every year to tax evasion. brussels is not amused, not least because the euro crisis is far from over. now europe is looking f ways to more effectively track down and penalize tax dodgers. in italy, tax collecting is done by the finance police, the guardia de finanza. employees often used dubious methods when chasing down tax defaulters. the tax collectors work on commission. the more people they catch, the better for them. that is putting pressure on ordinary italians, especially sml and medium-ze cpani. >> it was a spectacular protest against italy's new tax laws. the owner of a small beach bar scaled the dome of st. peter's basilica in rome and stayed put for some 24 hours. when he climbed back down, he was greeted by a cheering crowd. [applause] >> i really hope this tax issue is resolved soon and our small businesses as well as the whole economy can pick up again, at least a little. >> the tax measures by italy's technocrat government under the prime minister are another weapon i
of the reasons that london and the u.k. is trying to get out of the eu. >> well, you know, you talk about london surpassing new york. maybe so. you know, the a-market in london turned out fraud in it and they're keeping your capital in the industrialized world is bad, the fact that there is-- you're losing business, you should not lose. london was important before new york and it will be again. the fact that they don't know what the use of the funds will be, not the biggest concern. (laughter) >> i don't get it it. >> adam. >> hold on, charlie. first of all, we know what the money is used for, charlie hit it on the head to continue the farce that they've created, the promises they have made. the empires that have fallen into the ocean and they're killing themselves, adam. >> it won't work. >> adam don't you think it ultimately makes it harder for europe to be the strong, dominant place it used to be? >> i don't think this is going to keep europe. it's not at the top of the list, let's say that, they've got plenty of problems. >> all right, gerri, plenty of problems, is this the right solution?
chancellor merkel certainly wanted to keep in the e.u. because they never went into the eurozone. but they are an active member of the e.u.. she wants to keep them in. >> time is getting a little tight here, so let's go to two questions very quickly. right here and then right over here. >> do you think it would enhance economic opportunities in asia if we had more asian members of congress? >> that's an interesting thought. of course, some very senior members of congress, in fact, the senior senator just died who, inouye, who had tremendous clout there. and you're seeing more and or more asian members elected, male and female. and i think you'll continue to see that. you know -- >> who else -- [inaudible] >> well, you have, i think there are several. you have one who's a korean, i think you have one korean-american, and i think you'll see more going forward because you've got a lot of asian americans who are mayors, you know, in major cities. and i think that the answer is i think would be very helpful to have more asian-americans as members of congress. and, of course, you had g
of the leaders from the eu and the other sort of entities that are here trying to understand how they're dealing with their problems. and i think coming out of all of this will be a renewed sense that in america we can compete and we will compete and we will continue to be the destination for capital and innovation. >> we have a natural gas boom and we have an oil boom and we have, thanks to low interest rates, what appears to be some sort of a housing boom. so much more can happen and, in fact, it seems like the only body, the only institution that might stand in the way of 2013 being a great year is congress. >> well, listen, there is certainly not the outcome that anybody wants. and i'm hoping that after we've been through the election and last november. we've been through a fiscal cliff debate. we are working our way through a debt ceiling debate. i think in a responsible manner. with an eye towards trying to fix some problems. >> when you look at the options out there. president obama budget proposal and paul ryan's offer, they both don't do what guys like you say need to be done. balancing
know, the e.u. wants to spend $250 billion, but it only movedded the needle lower on the temperature by one degree fahrenheit. the point being is what's the best way to go about this? do we just throw money at the problem when you have big companies like ge and morgan stanley, you know, at the table, ready to benefit from it, or do you do what the utilities are doing, methane, carbon capture. >> a multiprongedded approach. at the end of the day, we can want afford to be on the wrong side of history on this or live life in the short term. this is an absolute concern. at the end of the day, face it, the market is worth $6 trillion. we want a piece of that in america. liz: what do you think? >> we do, but now is not the right time. we have to get the market back to creating jobs, talking less than 150,000 on a monthly basis, 8% unemployment, and the government needs to redistrict focuses to get the economy back online rather than focusing on clean energy right now. liz: phil, is north korea and iran or climate change the biggest threat? >> clearly the threats from countries like north k
barack obama and the eu, i think even hillary clinton would agree at this point, what difference does it make? which, by the way is going to be her campaign slogan in 2016. the nobel peace prize should go to people who risk their lives and doing heroic work and whose efforts will be magna advertised by recognition from this award. hillary clinton does not risk her life. she does not do heroic work. i have been waiting all day to hear from mr. garland nixon about what she has done for any tangible effort at peace whatsoever. >> garland, let us know? what do you think? >> a couple of things. first of all with former president clinton, if you look at the clinton foundation, they have donated upwards of $30 million to haiti since the earthquake. they have been responsible for literally millions of people getting -- in africa getting medication for h.i.v. and aids. it's hard to question the clinton foundation and what they have done. >> what about hillary? secretary clinton i should say. >> one of the important things she has done is taken the state department in a fundamentally different
sessions already with our eu partners on doing exactly that. one interesting aspect you raised is those have not necessarily included the private sector or the critical infrastructure sectors. expanding the aperture to do that would make sense. >> in our last few minutes, thank you offer very important questions. secretary naplitano, as the content your future -- as you think about your future and some of the unfinished business, what is your highest priority? >> i think when i look at where i will be spending my time, aside from the management integration type issues, i think the coming immigration debate is something that we will be deeply involved in. we have deep and wide experience in those issues. cyber, we have already mentioned. then the constantly evolving types of terrorists threats and hamdi can better educate ourselves -- and how we can better educate ourselves, trained law enforcement, ascertain from history and otherwise what are better ways to identify behavior's indicate -- in take up potential violence, those are the things that concern me -- ways to identify and behavi
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)